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Joel-Peter Witkin in Conversation with Brainard Carey
Joel-Peter Witkin in Conversation with Brainard Carey
Yale University

Joel-Peter Witkin is a photographer whose images of the human condition are undeniably powerful. For more than forty years, he has pursued his interest in spirituality and how it impacts the physical world in which we exist. Finding beauty within the grotesque, Witkin pursues this complex issue through people most often cast aside by society-human spectacles including hermaphrodites, dwarfs, amputees, androgynies, carcasses, people with odd physical anomalies, fetishists, and “any living myth… anyone bearing the wounds of Christ”. His fascination with other people’s physicality has inspired works that confront our sense of normalcy and decency while constantly examining the teachings handed down through Christianity.

Joel-Peter Witkin on the Beauty of the Grotesque
Joel-Peter Witkin on the Beauty of the Grotesque
By Christina Cacouris

In Joel-Peter Witkin’s world, death is not to be feared. Instead, there is beauty in the macabre, and some humor there too, as evidenced from his lifelong career creating photographs that evoke a range of reactions from outrage to wonder. With still lifes featuring dismembered body parts, and portraits of transsexual people posed in classical art forms, Witkin’s brand of subversiveness has established him as one of the most important contemporary photographers today. 

From the Archives: Postmodern Heretics
From the Archives: Postmodern Heretics
By Eleanor Heartney

On the occasion of the December 2022 print edition of A.i.A., the Religion Issue, we revisit this article from February 1997 that also explores how religion can play a significant role in shaping artists’ world views and artwork. In this case, Eleanor Heartney considered the link between Catholicism and four artists—Robert Mapplethorpe, Kiki Smith, Andres Serrano, and Joel-Peter Witkin—who became favorite targets of the political and religious right in the 1990s.

Forbes: Fierce, Not Afraid. Indigenous Photography Takes The Spotlight
Forbes: Fierce, Not Afraid. Indigenous Photography Takes The Spotlight

Speaking with Light: Contemporary Indigenous Photography at the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Ft. Worth, TX takes on the history of how photography was used on Native Americans and how its increasingly being used by Native Americans. It stands as one of the first major museum surveys exploring the practices of Indigenous photographers working today.

Speaking with Light expresses what it means to live in contemporary Native North America through the lenses of young and mid-career artists such as Wendy Red Star (Apsáalooke), Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit/Unanga), Cara Romero (Chemehuevi) and Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk Nation/Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians), as well as their generational forebears, including Shelley Niro (Member of the Six Nations Reserve, Turtle Clan, Bay of Quinte Mohawk), Tom Jones (Ho-Chunk), Zig Jackson (Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara) and the late Shan Goshorn (Eastern Band Cherokee).

The Eye of Photography Feature: Joel-Peter Witkin
The Eye of Photography Feature: Joel-Peter Witkin
By Gilles Decamps

Joel-Peter Witkin: The Early Works, an exhibition consisting of twenty-four vintage photographic prints by one of the most idiosyncratic and recognizable photographers of the 20th century. With images spanning 1950 to 1978 – many of which are unique and have not yet been displayed – this exhibition offers the viewer rare insight into the origins of the artist’s innovative and distinctive vision.

Exhibition Review: Sarah Sense, Power Lines
Exhibition Review: Sarah Sense, Power Lines
Photograph Magazine

Power Lines engages with the forced physical assimilation of Native people and a process of psychological assimilation through the artifice of Hollywood and popular culture. With a nod to the growing field of Indigenous Futures, Sense’s works gesture in multiple directions, through the past and present, as well as toward a generative space of future preservation and possibility. She transforms source material, including colonial letters and maps from the archives of the British Library, into contemporary artifacts that allude to the retrieval of ancestral ways of being. The mathematics at play in the work, represented by the numbers inherent in weaving patterns, offer a further form of meaning in an increasingly uncertain world.

Historic Exhibition of Black Abstract Artists on Display at Zuccaire Gallery
Historic Exhibition of Black Abstract Artists on Display at Zuccaire Gallery
“Revisiting 5+1” Honors Professor Howardena Pindell on Her Retirement

A new exhibition at the Staller Center’s Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery, entitled “Revisiting 5+1,” examines a critical moment at the junction of abstract art, racial and gender politics, and student activism at Stony Brook University. The exhibition is a reflection on the historic 1969 exhibition of abstract art “5+1,” presenting works by the original artists alongside a new selection of major works by Black women working in abstraction.

The British Library: Sarah Sense
The British Library: Sarah Sense

Sarah Sense is a descendant of two Native American tribes (Chitimacha and Choctaw), a world traveller, and Eccles Centre Fellow. She uses Native weaving techniques to create artworks combining archival materials and landscape photography. With support from the Eccles Centre, she created Power Lines – a powerful series of work utilising colonial maps and letters found in the British Library’s Americas collection.

Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop at the Getty Center
Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop at the Getty Center
Following the Call: Celebrating the Spirit of Black Egypt
Following the Call: Celebrating the Spirit of Black Egypt
New book by Mishka Henner
New book by Mishka Henner
Dakota Mace art translates Diné history and beliefs
Dakota Mace art translates Diné history and beliefs
Chester Higgins' camera brings a 360 degree view to Black life
Chester Higgins' camera brings a 360 degree view to Black life
Adger Cowan’s Intimate Chronicle of Black American Life
Adger Cowan’s Intimate Chronicle of Black American Life
Adger Cowans featured in THE DREAM OF ULYSSES
Adger Cowans featured in THE DREAM OF ULYSSES
M.C. Escher Gets the Recognition He Deserves in New Retrospective Exhibition
M.C. Escher Gets the Recognition He Deserves in New Retrospective Exhibition
13 Ways of Looking at Landscape: Larry Silver's Connecticut Photographs
13 Ways of Looking at Landscape: Larry Silver's Connecticut Photographs
Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop
Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop
Adger Cowans: Sense and Sensibility
Adger Cowans: Sense and Sensibility
EXHIBITION REVIEW: REWIND
EXHIBITION REVIEW: REWIND
Ahmet Ertug by Thierry Grillet
Ahmet Ertug by Thierry Grillet
Brea Souders 'Vistas' in Artforum
Brea Souders 'Vistas' in Artforum
Dr. David Steel on M.C. Escher
Dr. David Steel on M.C. Escher
Chester Higgins’s Life in Pictures
Chester Higgins’s Life in Pictures
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